Inspiring Children’s Books for Black History Month

When our children did not grow up, this period children to read and reading speed have improved, they will begin to see is a pleasure to read.

Celebrate Black History with kids of all ages by reading these stories of African-Americans overcoming adversity and making their multicultural mark on the world.

Henry’s Freedom Box: A True Story from the Underground Railroad

This is the incredible story of Henry “Box” Brown escaping slavery by shipping himself to the north in a wooden crate. We learn that as a boy, Henry doesn’t know his age because nobody keeps records of slaves’ birthdays. As an adult working in a warehouse, he decides to take a major risk and mail himself in a box — to a world where he can have a “birthday” (his first day of freedom)
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This Jazz Man

Music and dance are great themes to explore with little kids during Black History Month. Preschoolers will love this toe-tapping, finger-snapping tribute to African-American jazz giants, set to the rhythm of the classic children’s song “This Old Man.” The lively illustrations invite kids to “Deedle-di-bop!” along with classic musicians Charlie Parker, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Bill “Bojangles” and more.
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Whoever You Are

This book doesn’t directly address Black History, but it offers a preschooler-friendly introduction to the related concepts of diversity and equality. Award-winning author Mem Fox tells little ones that wherever they are, whatever they look like, and no matter their customs, there are other kids like them all around the globe: “Joys are the same, and love is the same. Pain is the same, and blood is the same.”
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Follow the Drinking Gourd

This is a folktale about a white sailor named “Peg Leg Joe” teaching a group of slaves a song to “follow the drinking gourd” (the Big Dipper) north to escape slavery. The rhythmic story and colorful paintings help show children the importance of the Underground Railroad — the secret path to freedom for thousands of African-Americans.
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The Other Side

The fence behind Clover’s house marks the town line that separates black people from white people. Clover’s mother warns her that it isn’t safe to cross the fence, but Clover is curious to meet Anna, the white girl who lives on the other side. The two girls work around the rules of segregation and form an unlikely friendship by sitting together on top of the fence.

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