Black Men History Book You Can Read For Your Children

They are always interested in anything when they are still as a kid. Just like we can look more funny book improve their’s hobby.

Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
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The author weaves immortal quotes from Martin Luther King Jr.’s writings and speeches into this award-winning biography for kids. The multimedia illustrations carry readers from King’s youth — when he first noticed “Whites Only” signs — through his remarkable life as a leader of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. (Check out these additional resources for Martin Luther King Day.)

Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom
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Introduce children to Harriet Tubman, the champion of the Underground Railroad who earned the nickname “Moses” for leading hundreds of slaves to freedom. Spirited text and paintings portray how Tubman’s compassion, courage, and deep religious faith helped her lead 19 trips from the south to the north in order to help fellow African-Americans.

Tar Beach
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It’s 1939, and young Cassie Louise Lightfoot is picnicking with her family and friends on “tar beach” — the hot, black rooftop of her family’s Harlem apartment. Cassie lays down and dreams that she is soaring above New York City — finding beauty in the views of the George Washington Bridge (which her father helped build) while also noting the signs of social injustice in the crowded city below.

Teammates
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This book takes us back to 1947, when Jackie Robinson became the first African-American player in Major League Baseball. He was taunted and terrorized by baseball fans, opposing players, and even his own teammates on the Brooklyn Dodgers. Historical photos and watercolor illustrations transport us to the fateful game when Pee Wee Reese, the Dodgers shortstop, embraced Robinson on the field as his teammate in front of a heckling crowd of spectators.

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African-Americans
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This richly illustrated 108-page book chronicles the immense challenges and important societal contributions of African-Americans throughout history. It’s told from the unique perspective of a wise, old African-American “Everywoman” narrator whose ancestors arrived on slave ships and who lives to proudly cast a vote for the nation’s first black president.